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How to improve your recovery – Part III

Todays topic is Relaxation

Relaxation is to day time what sleeping is to night time, making it another heavy hitter in our recovery toolkit.

In fact, relaxation is not only one of the most important recovery tools, but is also the reason that a variety of other recovery modalities have an effect. In a perfect world, everyone would spend a large amount of their non­-training time in a state of relaxation, minimizing physical and psychological efforts.

In the real world, most of us have jobs, families, and a variety of other commitments, so there are some significant recovery hurdles facing us. In my experience, many coaches and athletes dismiss the idea of promoting relaxation as lazy.

The joke is unfortunately on them and the athletes/ people they train, as skipping relaxation will have them missing out on a massive potential recovery benefits.

Relaxation can be summarized as the process of bringing someone from a heightened state of physical and psychological arousal to a state of physical and psychological calmness.

How does relaxation work?

As physical and psychological stressors accumulate throughout the day, they typically induce varying degrees of stress responses, such as increases in sympathetic nervous system activity (the fight or flight system) and circulation of stress hormones such as cortisol, epinephrine, and norepinephrine, all of which can inhibit or blunt the recovery­ adaptive processes. (Read our blog on Stress for more info)

Relaxation can not only help reduce the active stress responses, but can also activate the parasympathetic nervous system (the ‘rest and digest’ system) this directly stimulates recovery and adaptation.

Typical outcomes from relaxation can include:

  • Decreased heart rate and blood pressure
  • Decreased respiration
  • Decreased metabolic stress
  • Decreases in circulating catabolic hormone concentrations
  • Decreases in catabolic cell signalling / increases in anabolic cell signalling
  • Improvements in mood and affect
  • Decreases in anxiety
  • Decreases in perception of fatigue and tiredness

There is a lot of direct and indirect relaxation strategies available. Recovery strategies sometimes come packaged as exotic or “miracle” tricks and treatments, but their positive effects are often just a by product of relaxation. Direct relaxation practices are straightforward and can be thought of as dedicated times to minimize physical and psychological efforts.

It’s as easy as it sounds—just try to avoid doing anything stressful for a set period of time.

Indirect relaxation methods are those in which a dedicated activity is promoting relaxation, such as breathing techniques and meditation. In in direct relaxation, the techniques themselves may or may not have any direct merit, however, if they successfully enable us to relax, this is arguably much more important.

It’s very easy to ride a scientific high horse and dismiss what appear to be silly, but at the end of the day, If you find a way to relax, no matter how silly the method, it will produce better performance by way of enhanced recovery.

Since relaxation practices have to be more strategically placed within the confines of our schedules, if your free time for relaxation practices is limited, the best times to schedule these would be:

  • In the immediate two hours post exercise
  • During a planned hour or so wind down routine before bedtime I cannot be overstated that when it comes to relaxation and recovery, more is better.

 

These times will provide the biggest bang buck. Relaxation performed immediately after training can help reduce catabolic stress (refer to our blog on stress) and stimulate some of the more time sensitive aspects of anabolism. Relaxing before bed can help reduce our physical and psychological arousal levels, and allow for a quick and seamless transition into sleep, our most beneficial recovery modality. At the very least, even if you can’t hit the recommended times in particular, seek out 45 to 60 minutes of planned relaxation time as often as possible.

During this time, avoid anything that may cause additional stress, such as checking emails, taking phone calls, work, chores, planning, and the like. Instead, take those 45 to 60 minutes do whatever it is you want to do.

Now, you might be wondering, what types of activities can we do to promote relaxation?

There are certainly a lot of choices! Some may seem obvious, while others are things you may already be doing, but never really thought of as a “relaxation activity”.

Here are some examples:

  • Sitting or lying in a comfortable position
  • Eating a meal
  • Reading your favourite book or graphic novel
  • Watching TV or movies
  • Listening to music
  • Recreational socializing via phone, text or chat
  • Playing video games
  • Using breathing techniques
  • Meditation
  • Some forms of Yoga
  • Spending time with friends, family, and pets
  • Sitting by a fire
  • Playing an instrument
  • Hobbies
  • Sensory deprivation chambers

 

We’re usually inclined to do the simple things, like sit on the couch, eat a post training meal, and watch tv for an hour, but there is no reason to stop at that, as plenty of others can also have a similar relaxation effect.

Something to think about relaxation in the daytime is the equivalent to sleeping at night, and although not quite as powerful as sleep itself, it should also be a major priority.

The goal is to enter a state where recovery can occur—what gets you there is entirely your choice. Even in cases where recovery works by a non-­relaxation related mechanism, we would argue that relaxation is still a contributing factor to the recovery achieved. Better established recovery methods like ice, dynamic or static compression, and hot baths have a distinct temperature or compression related benefit, but at the same time, these treatments necessitate you sitting or lying down and doing nothing for a while, so may to some degree confound the results by adding the potent recovery power of relaxation. Perhaps more appropriately, those treatments serve as an avenue for initiating relaxation while simultaneously providing their distinct benefit. Within this very large central concept of relaxation.

We also have the additional sub­consideration of planned rest. Although this largely operates in the same manner as general relaxation, it does carry some additional practical significance.

Each and every person will need a different make up for relaxation. It is the simplest and in the end it doesn’t cost you anything, so have a think and make a list. Once you have that list work on implementing it into your restoration.

Todays topic is Relaxation

Relaxation is to day time what sleeping is to night time, making it another heavy hitter in our recovery toolkit.

In fact, relaxation is not only one of the most important recovery tools, but is also the reason that a variety of other recovery modalities have an effect. In a perfect world, everyone would spend a large amount of their non­-training time in a state of relaxation, minimizing physical and psychological efforts.

In the real world, most of us have jobs, families, and a variety of other commitments, so there are some significant recovery hurdles facing us. In my experience, many coaches and athletes dismiss the idea of promoting relaxation as lazy.

The joke is unfortunately on them and the athletes/ people they train, as skipping relaxation will have them missing out on a massive potential recovery benefits.

Relaxation can be summarized as the process of bringing someone from a heightened state of physical and psychological arousal to a state of physical and psychological calmness.

How does relaxation work?

As physical and psychological stressors accumulate throughout the day, they typically induce varying degrees of stress responses, such as increases in sympathetic nervous system activity (the fight or flight system) and circulation of stress hormones such as cortisol, epinephrine, and norepinephrine, all of which can inhibit or blunt the recovery­ adaptive processes. (Read our blog on Stress for more info)

Relaxation can not only help reduce the active stress responses, but can also activate the parasympathetic nervous system (the ‘rest and digest’ system) this directly stimulates recovery and adaptation.

Typical outcomes from relaxation can include:

  • Decreased heart rate and blood pressure
  • Decreased respiration
  • Decreased metabolic stress
  • Decreases in circulating catabolic hormone concentrations
  • Decreases in catabolic cell signalling / increases in anabolic cell signalling
  • Improvements in mood and affect
  • Decreases in anxiety
  • Decreases in perception of fatigue and tiredness

There is a lot of direct and indirect relaxation strategies available. Recovery strategies sometimes come packaged as exotic or “miracle” tricks and treatments, but their positive effects are often just a by product of relaxation. Direct relaxation practices are straightforward and can be thought of as dedicated times to minimize physical and psychological efforts.

It’s as easy as it sounds—just try to avoid doing anything stressful for a set period of time.

Indirect relaxation methods are those in which a dedicated activity is promoting relaxation, such as breathing techniques and meditation. In in direct relaxation, the techniques themselves may or may not have any direct merit, however, if they successfully enable us to relax, this is arguably much more important.

It’s very easy to ride a scientific high horse and dismiss what appear to be silly, but at the end of the day, If you find a way to relax, no matter how silly the method, it will produce better performance by way of enhanced recovery.

Since relaxation practices have to be more strategically placed within the confines of our schedules, if your free time for relaxation practices is limited, the best times to schedule these would be:

  • In the immediate two hours post exercise
  • During a planned hour or so wind down routine before bedtime I cannot be overstated that when it comes to relaxation and recovery, more is better.

 

These times will provide the biggest bang buck. Relaxation performed immediately after training can help reduce catabolic stress (refer to our blog on stress) and stimulate some of the more time sensitive aspects of anabolism. Relaxing before bed can help reduce our physical and psychological arousal levels, and allow for a quick and seamless transition into sleep, our most beneficial recovery modality. At the very least, even if you can’t hit the recommended times in particular, seek out 45 to 60 minutes of planned relaxation time as often as possible.

During this time, avoid anything that may cause additional stress, such as checking emails, taking phone calls, work, chores, planning, and the like. Instead, take those 45 to 60 minutes do whatever it is you want to do.

Now, you might be wondering, what types of activities can we do to promote relaxation?

There are certainly a lot of choices! Some may seem obvious, while others are things you may already be doing, but never really thought of as a “relaxation activity”.

Here are some examples:

  • Sitting or lying in a comfortable position
  • Eating a meal
  • Reading your favourite book or graphic novel
  • Watching TV or movies
  • Listening to music
  • Recreational socializing via phone, text or chat
  • Playing video games
  • Using breathing techniques
  • Meditation
  • Some forms of Yoga
  • Spending time with friends, family, and pets
  • Sitting by a fire
  • Playing an instrument
  • Hobbies
  • Sensory deprivation chambers

 

We’re usually inclined to do the simple things, like sit on the couch, eat a post training meal, and watch tv for an hour, but there is no reason to stop at that, as plenty of others can also have a similar relaxation effect.

Something to think about relaxation in the daytime is the equivalent to sleeping at night, and although not quite as powerful as sleep itself, it should also be a major priority.

The goal is to enter a state where recovery can occur—what gets you there is entirely your choice. Even in cases where recovery works by a non-­relaxation related mechanism, we would argue that relaxation is still a contributing factor to the recovery achieved. Better established recovery methods like ice, dynamic or static compression, and hot baths have a distinct temperature or compression related benefit, but at the same time, these treatments necessitate you sitting or lying down and doing nothing for a while, so may to some degree confound the results by adding the potent recovery power of relaxation. Perhaps more appropriately, those treatments serve as an avenue for initiating relaxation while simultaneously providing their distinct benefit. Within this very large central concept of relaxation.

We also have the additional sub­consideration of planned rest. Although this largely operates in the same manner as general relaxation, it does carry some additional practical significance.

Each and every person will need a different make up for relaxation. It is the simplest and in the end it doesn’t cost you anything, so have a think and make a list. Once you have that list, work on implementing it into your restoration.

 

How to recover better Part II –SLEEP!!!

Today i have covered sleep and how it effects your sleep 

If you’ve ever spent a night tossing and turning, you already know how you’ll feel the next day some of them are probably tired, cranky, and out of sorts. But missing out on the recommended 7 to 9 hours of shut-eye nightly does more than make you feel groggy and grumpy. The long term effects of sleep deprivation are real. It drains your mental abilities and puts your physical health at real risk. Science has linked poor slumber with all kinds of health problems, from weight gain to a weakened immune system.

Your body needs sleep, just as it needs oxygen and nutritious food to function at its best. During sleep, your body recovers and restores its chemical balance. Your brain forges new connections and helps memory retention. Without enough sleep, your brain and body systems won’t function normally. It can also dramatically lower your quality of life. Some studies have found that sleeping for less than 6 to 8 hours a night increases the risk of early death by as much as 12%

The obvious signs of sleep deprivation are:

  • excessive sleepiness
  • yawning
  • irritability
  • daytime fatigue

Stimulants like caffeine aren’t enough to override your body’s profound need for sleep. Behind the scenes, chronic sleep deprivation can interfere with your body’s internal systems and cause more than just the initial signs and symptoms listed above.

The effects of Poor sleep on certain vital systems

  1. Central nervous system

Your central nervous system is the information highway of your body. Sleep is necessary to keep it functioning properly. Chronic insomnia can disrupt how your body sends and receives information.

During sleep, your body forms pathway’s between nerve cells (neurons) and your brain, from things you may have learnt during the day. This is how we remember new information. Sleep deprivation leaves your brain exhausted, so it can’t perform at its peak. This then has an on flow effects to poor concentration, with poor concentration we the start having trouble learning new things.

Sleep deprivation also negatively affects your mental abilities and emotional state. You may feel more impatient or be more prone to mood swings.

There has been cases where sleep deprivation has got so bad that people have had hallucinations.

Other psychological risks include:

  • impulsive behavior
  • depression
  • paranoia
  • suicidal thoughts

2) The Immune system

While you sleep, your immune system produces protective, infection-fighting substances like cytokines. It uses these substances to combat foreign invaders such as bacteria and viruses. Cytokines also help you sleep, giving your immune system more energy to defend your body against illness.

Sleep deprivation prevents your immune system from building up its forces. It may also take you longer to recover from illness. Long-term sleep deprivation also increases your risk for chronic illnesses like diabetes and heart disease.

3) Respiratory system

The relationship between sleep and the respiratory system goes both ways. A night time breathing disorder called obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can interrupt your sleep and lower the quality of your sleep. As you wake up throughout the night, this can cause sleep deprivation, which leaves you more vulnerable to respiratory infections like the common cold and flu. Sleep deprivation can also make existing respiratory diseases worse, such as chronic lung illness.

4) Digestive system

Along with eating too much and not exercising, sleep deprivation is another risk factor for becoming overweight and obesity. Sleep affects the levels of two hormones, leptin and ghrelin, which control feelings of hunger and fullness.

Leptin tells your brain that you’ve had enough to eat. Without enough sleep, your brain reduces leptin and raises ghrelin, which is an appetite stimulant. The flux of these hormones could explain night time snacking or why someone may over eat later in night. A lack of sleep can also contribute to weight gain by making you feel too tired to exercise.

Sleep deprivation also prompts your body to release higher levels of insulin after you eat. Insulin controls your blood sugar level. Higher insulin levels promote fat storage and increase your risk for type 2 diabetes.

5) Cardiovascular system

Sleep affects processes that keep your heart and blood vessels healthy, including your blood sugar, blood pressure, and inflammation levels. It also plays a vital role in your body’s ability to heal and repair the blood vessels and heart.

Studies have linked People who don’t sleep enough are at higher risk of cardiovascular disease as well as an increased risk of heart attack and stroke.

6) Endocrine system

Hormone production is dependent on your sleep. For testosterone production, you need at least three hours of uninterrupted sleep, which is about the time of your first REM episode. This interruption can also affect growth hormone production, especially in children and adolescents. These hormones help build muscle mass and repair cells and tissues. The pituitary gland releases growth hormones continuously, but sleep and exercise also help induce the release of this hormone.

With all the above info covered on specific effect on each of the main systems in the body, hopefully you have a good background on how sleep effects your recovery.

Now we can go into the ways to improve sleep patterns!!

Getting a good night’s rest can be difficult. As we know from what we have covered from this point, Insufficient sleep raises your risk of accidental injury and many chronic health conditions, including diabetes, heart disease, and depression.

Getting the rest you need may require some changes. I believe it’s important to develop habits that promote good health and eliminate those that keep you up at night. Here are some tips to help you improve your sleep and prepare the perfect environment to catch some Zzz’s and improve your results.

1) Establish a routine

A consistent sleep schedule is a critical part of developing good sleep patterns. Frequently changing the times you go to bed and wake up confuses your body’s biological clock. Following a regular schedule, even on weekends and holidays. Doing this can improve your quality of your sleep as well as help you get the rest you need to perfume at your peak.

Some ideas to help this is to prepare your mind and body for sleep by developing a relaxing bedtime routine.

For example, take a warm shower/bath, listen to soothing music, read a book. This will signal to your body that bedtime is coming and help you fall asleep more quickly and easily.

2) Keep electronics out of your bed

Try to separate your bedroom from other facets of your life that may cause stress, tension, or stimulation. The presence of electronic devices such as laptops computers and phones can make it harder to fall asleep.

The blue light from glowing electronic screens suppresses your body’s production of melatonin, an important hormone for sleep. If you tend to associate your bed with activities other than sleep or sex, that can also make it harder to calm your mind and drift off.

Things to Avoid:

Watching television, using your computer, or checking your phone in bed. You should also avoid working, eating, or even having a heated discussion with your significant other in your sleeping environment. Strengthening the association between your bed and sleep may help you clear your mind at bedtime.

3) Mind what you drink

What you drink in the hours before bedtime can make or break your ability to fall asleep. Caffeine and alcohol are two common sleep disrupting culprits.

Caffeine is a stimulant that can keep you awake. According to many studies, the effects of caffeine can take six to eight hours to wear off. So avoid drinking caffeinated beverages, such as coffee or soda, in the late afternoon or evening.

Alcohol is a sedative that can make you tired, but it also disrupts the quality of your sleep. It can result in lighter and less restorative stages of sleep, which can leave you feeling groggy the next morning. The suggestions I found was to avoid drinking alcohol within three hours of bedtime.

For a positive effect on your sleep patterns, try drinking a small cup of something with a calming effect before bed, such as hot herbal tea or milk (Remember no caffeine ideally). Drinking too much of any liquid before bed may lead to bathroom trips during the night, which will also disrupt your sleep.

Using these tips above is some of the things i suggest for all of my clients to try and do.

They are not the only things to do.

In Part III of how to recover better i will cover training volume and it effect on recovery.

See you next week

 

Could stress be ruining you results!!!

Lets take a step back and look at what stress is first.

Stress is a natural human response to pressure when faced with challenging and sometimes dangerous situations. That pressure is not only about what’s happening around you, but often also about the demands we place on ourselves.

If stress lasts a long time or overwhelms us, our ability to cope with the following can be affected on our health, well being, relationships, work and general enjoyment of life.

With that in mind have you heard of Cortisol?

Cortisol is often called the stress hormone because of it’s direct connection to the body’s response to stress. Have you ever noticed that when you’re feeling stressed and overwhelmed, you also suffer from feeling exhausted? That is the effect of hormones such as cortisol. This feeling of been exhausted sometime also leads to getting a scratchy throat an even fall ill?

Cortisol is a steroid hormone. It is made in the cortex of the adrenal glands and then released into the blood which transports it around our body.  Almost every cell contains receptors for cortisol. This mean cortisol can have a lots of different affects depending on which sort of cells it is acting upon.

One of the major effects cortisol can have on you results is, its ability to influence the regulation of the body’s blood sugar levels. The flow on effect of this is our body cannot regulate our metabolism correctly. Cortisol also has an effect on the body’s ability to remember information, to fight inflammation, control salt and water balance, influence our blood pressure and if pregnant it can even affect the development of a foetus.

An interesting fact I found while looking in to cortisol is that in many species cortisol is believed to be responsible for triggering the processes involved in giving birth.

Another major effect of cortisol is, it’s a catabolic (breaking) hormone, one that induces muscle breakdown and visceral fat gain, slows down the immune system, and lowers testosterone levels in this process. That is where cortisol is damaging to your results.

The opposite of being catabolic or in a Catabolism state, is Anabolic, this process in the body is defined as anabolism.

The definition of anabolism is a constructive  metabolism; the synthesis in living organisms of more complex substances from simpler ones (opposed to catabolism). 

In simpler terms Catabolic is a destructive state to the body and results, Anabolic is a constructive state to the body and results.

As a flow on effect from the above is that Cortisol and testosterone are linked to each process mentioned above.

“Cortisol and testosterone are somewhat opposite sides of the coin… Cortisol is almost like an “enemy” when you’re interested in keeping your testosterone levels high.”

The above statement is partly true, but we also have to remember that cortisol is not completely useless to our bodies, it’s there for a reason.

One reason we need Cortisol is that it is the hormone that wakes us up in the morning, it’s deeply involved in the muscle glycocen storage/release process, and without cortisol humans would still be probably crawling instead of walking.

The fact of the matter is we need to have certain amount of cortisol for some of our most basic functions.  Our body is pretty good at protecting itself from the negative effects after all it has to protect itself for us to survive.

The problems start when your cortisol levels are elevated for prolonged periods of time. A situation we are seeing all too common these days in gyms. There is a large number of people who eat to much processed food, which creates a lacks of nutrients we need for a healthy body, ad chronic stress to that and you have a horrible mix.

I personally believe that most of us due to a number of circumstances have got too much cortisol circulating in our bloodstreams……And thats not good news for your Results.

Below is 5 different methods to stay in an anabolic state. 

1. Train Smart

Working out is a great way to stay healthy. It’s also an excellent way to increase your body’s natural production of all hormones including testosterone and growth hormone.

However there’s few factors that you NEED to take into consideration…

…Firstly, endurance training is notorious for skyrocketing cortisol production, whereas it also significantly lowers testosterone levels.

…Secondly, even though strength training is linked to increased testosterone production, too much of its will backfire. How? Simple most people over train. Overtraining skyrockets cortisol and plummets testosterone as mentioned before. That makes it damn hard to build any noticeable strength gains or amounts of muscle

Bottom line: the maintain your progression to your goals you have to some what learn to maximize a good amount of testosterone and reduce cortisol levels. Training methods I use with my client is to do intense and relatively short strength training sessions ideally 2-4 times a week. When it comes to cardio, quick bouts of high interval intensity training over endurance training like Tabata work outs.

2. Don’t go Crazy with Caffeine

Drinking copious amounts of coffee isnt going to help you.

Even though caffeine ingestion pre-workout is scientifically proven to increase testosterone levels by on average 15%, it’s also a proven fact that caffeine directly stimulates the adrenal cortex to release cortisol into the bloodstream. Annoying I know!

In this study they found out that 800 mg’s of caffeine before a work out was enough to increase cortisol by up to 44%.

Bottom line: Caffeine is OK, if you have balanced cortisol levels, but if you suffer from high cortisol and/or chronic stress, I would be wise to monitor the amounts of caffeine you intake.

3. Vitamin C

Multiple studies have found out that vitamin C supplementation after exercise helps clear cortisol but more importantly enhances recovery

The researchers in this study, found out that when vitamin C is administered before a stressful situation (in this study it was public speaking) it blunts the stress induced rise in cortisol. There has also been a  few animal studies that have linked vitamin C to increased testosterone production.

4. Sleep More

Lowering cortisol can be as simple as sleeping more. Sleep is great for everything really.

Sleeping more is not only good if you want to decrease cortisol and stress, it’s also one of the best ways to increase your natural testosterone production…

If you cant get enough sleep think about power naps

Keep an eye out for my blog on sleep next week!

5. Relaxation

Quite possibly the best way to reduce cortisol levels naturally is by relaxation.

Once the feelings of stress start to decrease, cortisol does the same.

For example, there is many studies that show meditation significantly lowers cortisol levels like this one (https://www.anabolicmen.com/how-to-lower-cortisol/)

So for those who don’t already take some time out of your busy schedule and just relax a bit. My suggestion is look in to Floating

So when you’re under stress and your cortisol levels are increased not only does this elevation of cortisol compromise your immune system, it also interrupts your ability to rest and relax thus aiding in losing a percentage of you results!!

If you need some help with finding the right training or would like to learn more about how we at Motion Fitness can help you improve your result contact us Via Face book or on 0404 307 448

How to improve your recovery – Part I

How do you improve your recovery……..?

One method is: Dynamic Compression

As a Personal trainer at Motion Fitness & Rehabilitation in a private gym in Canberra; I am always looking for ways that we can assist our clients with their recovery from session to session as well as from injuries and surgeries. Lets be honest, we all have injuries. Our goal as a gym/ fitness provider in Canberra is to help our clients maintain a pain free and active lifestyle for our clients as well as inform them how to train effectively to fit their lifestyle.

Hospitals around the world have used dynamic compression to prevent blood clots and to speed the healing of their patients after surgery for many years.  Researchers and Exercise Physiologists have now developed units that utilise this same principle of dynamic compression to help us all recover faster from whatever it is that we may be recovering from, whether it be a triathlon, or hours of working in your yard.  Motion Fitness & Rehabilitation are lucky enough to be one of very few gyms in the ACT area to offer a NormaTec “Dynamic Compression Recovery System”.

NormaTec is the leader in rapid recovery—it gives a competitive edge to the world’s elite athletes, coaches, and trainers. The reason we have branched out and created Normatec Canberra is we believe recovery should be an integral part of every clients training. One of the best attributes of Normtec is the ease of use. The systems is something that any client can use on their own, at their convenience which makes it an excellent way to accomplish better recovery.

The NormaTec PULSE PRO Recovery Systems are a dynamic compression device designed for recovery and rehab. There are 15 different pre-programed functions. All 15 programs in the patented NormaTec’s PULSE PRO system are to help you recover faster between training sessions and/or athletic performances.

The NormaTec system includes a control unit and attachments which go on the legs, arms, or hips. They use compressed air to massage your limbs, mobilize fluid, and speed up recovery. You will first experience a pre-inflate cycle, during which the connected attachments are moulded to your exact body shape. The session will then begin by compressing your feet, hands, or upper quad (depending on which attachment you are using). Similar to the kneading and stroking done during a massage. Each segment of the attachment will first compress in a pulsing manner and then release. This will repeat for each segment of the attachment as the compression pattern works its way up your limb.

Dynamic compression was Created by a physician bioengineer years ago to enhance blood flow and speed recovery. The NormaTec Pulse PRO Massage Pattern employs the three key techniques to maximize your recovery:

PULSING: Instead of using static compression (squeezing) to transport fluid out of the limbs, Sequential Pulse Technology uses dynamic compression (pulsing). The patented pulsing action mimics the muscle pump of the legs and arms, greatly enhancing the movement of fluid and metabolites out of the limbs after an intense workout.

GRADIENTS: Veins and lymphatic vessels have one-way valves that prevent fluid backflow. Similarly, NormaTec Pulse Pro Technology uses hold pressures to keep fluids from being forced in the wrong direction. Because of this enhancement, instead of tapering pressure off, PULSE PRO can deliver maximum pressure in every zone.

DISTAL RELEASE: Because extended static pressure can be detrimental to the body’s normal circulatory flow, Sequential Pulse Technology releases the hold pressures once they are no longer needed to prevent backflow. By releasing the hold pressure in each zone as soon as possible, each portion of the limb gains maximal rest time without a significant pause between compression cycles.

 

As part of ‘Normatec Canberrra’ opening, Motion Fitness will be offering 30 minute sessions for $15 for the rest of May and June.  To schedule your appointment please stop by any of our 3 locations or call us on 0404 307 448.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact me at: Motionfitness2014@gmail.com

 

To learn more about this amazing recovery system check out these short videos on this links below: 

Boston Celtics:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OuQRMkAf7mY

Kansas City Chiefs:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u_AdmnlLUPI

Baltimore Ravens:

http://www.baltimoreravens.com/news/article-1/Baltimore-Ravens-Provide-Players-With-State-Of-The-Art-NormaTec-Recovery-Room/bd6a2b45-77f5-44f5-8298-9fe0684a5330

New York Jets:

http://www.espn.com/blog/new-york-jets/post/_/id/62438/jets-c-nick-mangold-feels-great-thanks-to-science-and-magic-legs

https://www.normatecrecovery.com/news/

 

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